When I described our most recent restructuring plan to a friend – a seasoned and successful financial professional - he was certain we must have hired McKinsey & Co. to help us think things through. Wrong. It was Erika Andersen. Danny Meyer, CEO, Union Square Hospitality Group

Aug
23

Doing Something New

After almost 4 years of blogging on Typepad, we’ve moved my blog (we meaning Tim Grahl and his crew at Out:think) to WordPress.

This is my first post on the new platform.  It’s pretty much the same – title at the header, same options for posting and commenting, same bar of menu items above this text space, etc.  And yet it feels a little harder, a little odd — just because it’s new.

Which reminds me, yet again, of the interesting relationship we humans have with habit trails. When you’re familiar with something, it feels comfortable; it’s easy, it doesn’t take a lot of mental investment.  Which can feel relaxing and a relief – or boring and stifling.

It seems to me that many people have a hard time finding a balance of habit and newness that feels good to them.  Some folks seem to crave the excitement of something new (job, relationship, idea, friends, home) to the extent that they don’t go deep, get comfortable, build trust.  And other people seem so wedded to the familiar, to their rituals and habits, that they don’t stretch themselves, test their capabilities, open themselves to new ideas or approaches.

I suspect we’re meant to find a balance. Unlike most other creatures on the planet, we each have the capacity to envision and then move toward a new and different future: we can want to become, have or do something else.

In my observation, most people who feel happy and successful  have both a nest – relationships, places and activities that are continuous and deeply important in their lives – and some ‘flights away from the nest’ – activities, ideas and creations that are true and substantive departures from their day-to-day.

How’s your balance of safe/familiar and new/untested?

Posted in Thinking


About Erika Andersen

Over the past 30 years, Erika has developed a reputation for creating approaches to learning and business-building that are custom tailored to her clients’ challenges, goals, and culture.
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Visit Erika's Forbes.com Blog


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