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Jan
22

Language As a Living Creature

My partner Jeff sent me this wonderful article from The Week a few days ago.  It’s a list (with definitions) of 14 words for which there are no English equivalents.  A couple of them pinpoint experiences I’ve had so precisely (Koi No Yokan, in Japanese, is the sense upon first meeting a person that the two of you are going to fall in love) or are so obviously high-utility (Zeg, In Georgian, means ‘the day after tomorrow’) that I immediately wanted to co-opt them and insert them into English.

And it made me reflect on the wonderfully organic nature of language.  Live languages grow like organisms: they evolve toward usefulness and away from functional dead ends; they interbreed with other languages to acquire elements that serve them better.  For instance, think of all the words that we now think of as English, but that are actually borrowing of genetic material, if you will, from other languages.  Words that we added into our lexicon because we didn’t have a good word in English for the concept or thing they describe.  A few examples:

Kindergarten – German for “children’s garden”; a great word to describe a place where children go to grow that’s not quite a school but more than a play group

Rendezvous – In French, rendez – vous, ”go to you”; a meeting, usually with one other person, at a predetermined time and place…a very useful word, and so – voila! – we now think of it as English. (Like “voila,” a contraction of vois la which means “see there” and which we use to mean lots of things, from “there you go,” to “here it so,” or “so it happens.”  Also very useful.)

Pundit – In Hindi payndit is ‘a learned man, master or teacher.’ Good to have a single word to describe someone who is considered (though perhaps only self-considered) an expert on a particular topic.

And then there are all the words that morph into new parts of speech to suit a particular need. At what exact point in time, I wonder, did Google become a verb as well as a descriptive noun?

As the pace of change and the globalization of communication continues, I can’t wait to see what the next decade brings in terms of the evolution of the English language.

For myself, I’m going to just start using a bunch of these words – including Lagom (Swedish for ”Not too much, and not too little, but juuuuust right”).

 



About Erika Andersen

erika Over the past 30 years, Erika has developed a reputation for creating approaches to learning and business-building that are custom tailored to her clients’ challenges, goals, and culture.
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