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Archive for December, 2013

Dec
26

‘Tis The Season

My husband likes to poke (gentle) fun at my addiction to Christmas movies. During this time of year, every time I start watching another one, he says, “And I bet in this one, everyone will finally discover the true meaning of Christmas.”

I always laugh – and yet that is, of course, the premise of pretty much every Christmas movie ever produced: someone starts out hard-hearted and Grinch-ified, and ends up having discovered that: 1) the most important thing is love, 2) it’s better to give than to receive, and 3) there are people who want to love and support you – if you can accept their help.

The interesting thing is that, generally speaking, those 3 things are true.  And they’re true all the time. It’s just that most people seem to think it’s eye-rollingly, embarassingly sappy to allude to these things except during the last two weeks of December. Somehow, during the Christmas season, we’re willing to put aside our pretensions to world-weary cynicism sufficiently to focus on the power of love, the joy of giving, the satisfaction of recognizing that we are loved – and the gratitude that arises from all these things.

Now, I’m realistic enough to know that millions of people have very mixed feelings about this season, and that for some – especially those in need or who have experienced personal tragedy during the holiday season in years past – those feelings are mixed heavily toward the negative.

But too many people also seem to believe that it’s somehow not cool to be too happy about the Christmas season if others are having a hard time. I’m sorry, but that just seems goofy to me: it’s like saying that you shouldn’t feel grateful for good health because some people are sick; or you shouldn’t love your spouse because some people have bad marriages.

My point of view: revel in the simple love, joy and generosity that abound in this season.  Share your love, your hope and your gifts with those in need and with those you love.  Feel grateful; feel contented; feel loved and loving; feel joyful.

Having a a wonderful holiday season doesn’t hurt anyone; it helps you and those with whom you come in contact.  And perhaps it will even move the world toward more love all year ’round.

With deepest hopes for a deliciously loving, giving and grateful holiday season.

Posted in Community, people

Dec
2

Seeing Selling Differently

courtesy of nostalgiapassages.com

courtesy of nostalgiapassages.com

I’ve always had a pretty good relationship with the idea of selling.  For some reason, even from an early age, I had the idea that sales was simply about finding people who had a real need for what I had to offer. So, for instance, selling Camp Fire Girls candy in grade school held no terrors for me: I’d go around and ask people if they wanted to buy it, and if not, I’d ask the next person.  I figured there was no harm in asking, even if they didn’t want it – and them not wanting it didn’t have anything to do with me; maybe they didn’t like candy, or were on a diet, or had already bought some from somebody else.

And actually, that’s pretty much how I sell today, 50 years later.  I set up a conversation with someone; I listen to find out whether he or she could have a need for something Proteus offers.  If so, I explain the service or product I think they might find useful. I ask if they’re interested in exploring a possible fit between their need and our offer.  If not, I assume it’s because they 1) don’t see the need in the same way I do, or 2) they believe they have a better way of meeting that need that doesn’t involve Proteus.  Next!

I recently read a wonderful little book, Dan Pink’s To Sell Is Human, that pretty much reinforced the positive ideas I’ve had about selling for all these years.

However, it also made it much clearer to me why most people don’t view sales in a positive light – why they have a ‘cringe’ relationship with the idea of selling. Rather than seeing it as a collaborative, mutually beneficial process of finding a fit between need and offer, they see it as manipulative, pushy, inauthentic, slightly sleazy.  Sales, for most people, evokes images of being glad-handed and lied to by some untrustworthy used car salesman in a shiny suit and bad toupee.  No wonder people think they don’t like to sell!

The problem with holding on to that old, outmoded conception of selling is that almost all of us need to be able to sell.  If you define selling, as Pink does, as ‘the art of moving others,’ we’re selling ideas, opinions, and proposed courses of action every day – to our kids, our boss, our spouses, our PTA group, our employees.

And for those of us who are entrepreneurs or freelancers, even more of our time is spent ‘moving others’ to see that fit between our business or ourselves and their need.

So it makes sense to shift our ideas about selling – and that means (you know this is favorite topic of mine) changing our self-talk.  Here’s a quick and simple exercise for doing just that:

1) Ask yourself: What words come to mind when I think of myself as a salesperson?

2) Listen to the response that arises inside your head:

2a) If you find you’re thinking words like helpful, partner, problem-solver, relationship builder, mutual benefit  – congratulations. You have the core mindset of a successful 21st century salesperson.

2b) If your thoughts are running more along the lines of words like rejection, pushiness, annoying, drudgery, scary – I suggest you continue on to step 3.

3) What could you say to yourself differently that’s more positive and hopeful about the idea of you selling – yet still feels true to you?  I asked my husband (whose self-talk about selling is quite negative) and his response was, “I have a great product that some people will find useful. If people don’t want to buy it, it’s no reflection on me.” Great, simple, positive, accurate.

4) Once you’ve come up up with more supportive (yet still believable) self-talk, you’ll need to remind yourself of it whenever your old, unhelpful self-talk muscles its way toward the front of your brain.

Changing your mindset in this way is key to feeling differently and then acting differently about selling. And as selling starts to occupy a new place in your brain and heart, you might feel comfortable enough to explore ways to get better and better at it.

Just in case, here are two articles to support your evolution: The Unexpected Secret to Being a Great Salesperson, a post on my Forbes blog from earlier this year, and Sales Tips: 4Ways to Avoid Cold Calling, a post I wrote for the Salesforce blog.