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Archive for March, 2016

Mar
21

Spreading Good Ideas…Person-to-Person

First, my apologies for not posting last month.  It’s been a bit wild in Proteus-land lately, all for very good reasons. There’s a lot happening because we have a number of new clients and new consultants – which is fun and exciting, and requires attention and effort.

The main wildness-inducer for me, though, has been the launch of my new book, Be Bad First.  The official publication date was March 8 – but the pub date is less and less meaningful these days: the hard copy, e-book and audio versions were all available on Amazon before that date, and lots of interviews, reviews, and articles had already come out related to the book. Two things I’m especially excited about: an article about the book’s model in the March issue of HBR, Learning to Learn, and the book being selected as an Editor’s Choice by 800CEOREAD.

There’s a tremendous amount of  effort involved in putting out a book, not only for me, but for our publishers and publicists — and the Proteus staff (especially my wingman Dan) have done a lot to support the book’s success, as well. But it all seems worth it: having these ideas about learning and mastery out in the world is good for lots of people.  It supports the growth of our business, it gives our consultants more tools to help our clients, and it helps those clients navigate this complex world.

The part of writing a book that’s especially meaningful and almost magical to me is knowing that thousands of people I will never meet or know are reading it and, I hope, benefitting from it.  I love thinking about them finding out about it, deciding there’s something in it that might be interesting to them, and then starting to read or listen.  A long-time client and friend of mine was commuting into NYC on the Long Island Railroad a few weeks ago, and the woman across from him (he didn’t know her), pulled Be Bad First out of her bag and showed it to her seat mate, remarking that she was reading and liking it.  He took it from her and started reading the back cover – that’s when my friend Brad shot this picture.

IMG_3536[1] I loved having this little window into two people I don’t know (and may never know) being touched by the book and (I hope) exploring the ANEW model.  I love even more getting to see the viral aspect of this: she liked it, and then told someone about it. It’s lovely to imagine that happening all over the world (we’ve just heard that they’ve sold the rights in China, and are working on a rights sale in South America)…people being helped to become better learners, and turning to friends, family, colleagues, and telling them about it, so they can become better learners and more able to future-proof themselves, in order to thrive through change.

It’s one of the great things about living in a world where knowledge can spread so quickly and efficiently – one person, one idea, one action, can have a huge positive impact. So: do good things.

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If you’ve read Be Bad First and enjoyed it, please spread the word by writing a review on Amazon.  Thanks in anticipation!